What Is a Light-Duty Assignment?

When a doctor puts you on "light duty" restrictions, the insurance company tells your employer that you should be working and asks your employer to provide a job that you can do. When your employer lets you work "light duty," it is the employer, not the insurance company, that is paying you.

Although your employer may give you a "light duty" job, the employer usually wants you to do more work than you can actually do. You get caught in the middle. Your employer is having to pay you, but there really is no work you can do that makes you worth the same money that you were being paid before you were injured.

Why Is the Doctor Telling Me to Do Light Duty?

The reason your doctor is not taking you completely off of work is because he or she does not want the insurance company to send its business somewhere else. The reason the insurance company doesn't want the doctor to take you off work is because the insurance company has to pay temporary total disability benefits if the doctor takes you completely out of work.

In its effort to save itself money, the insurance company can damage your relationship with your employer. Your employer is paying wages, but not getting the work it really needs. You have to go to work and possibly further injure yourself while trying to do a job that is much different from what you used to do.

An experienced workers' compensation attorney can help you by either getting you off work or making sure that you aren't hassled when you are working "light duty."

For Answers to Your Questions About Workers' Compensation

The Atlanta, Georgia, law firm of Hilley & Frieder offers a free initial consultation to answer your questions about light duty assignments. Call 404-233-6200 or contact us by email to talk with a lawyer.

Ronald Hilley was the contributing attorney to this content.