As a driver on the roads, you know that large trucks are likely to share the roads with you. While you may be comfortable with them, it’s possible that the vehicles could collide with you or others, causing serious damage.

In 2012, there were over 100,000 injuries caused by large trucking accidents. In total, around 300,000 crashes took place, according to the National Highway and Traffic Safety Administration. In fact, truck driving has been ranked in the top 10 most dangerous jobs by Time magazine.

While driving a truck is dangerous, those around the trucks are in the most danger. Small passenger vehicles can easily fall into a trucker’s blind spots; that’s why truck drivers need to make sure to check their “no zones” before pulling into a different lane on the highway or turning.

Another risky area includes highway work zones. Around a third of all fatal work-zone crashes involve large trucks; drivers may be speeding or fail to see changes in the layout of the roadway. To prevent these crashes, drivers should be driving when alert and stay under the speed limit.

Maintenance issues can also put others at risk. For instance, a poorly maintained truck that blows tires can leave debris in the roadway that causes accidents. An overloaded truck could have its brakes go out, causing the truck to hit other stopped traffic from behind or harnesses and restraints could snap from too much pressure on them due to weight.

When mistakes lead to truck accidents, you have the option of seeking compensation from the driver or the driver’s company. Negligence should not be allowed when the risks are so high; you deserve to have your story heard and to receive the care you need after your accident.

Source: Esurance, “Truck driving tips: 7 safety rules for a long haul,” accessed July 21, 2016