carpal tunnel.jpeg

If you have a job that requires repeated motions, you may notice pain or discomfort in some part of your body, such as your hands, shoulder or neck. A doctor should be able to confirm if you have a repetitive stress injury and whether it developed over time.

Among other issues, repetitive stress injuries include bursitis, tendinitis, tennis elbow and carpal tunnel syndrome, which is one of the most common types of repetitive use injury.

What is carpal tunnel?

An example of a repetitive stress injury involves the median nerve in the wrist, which controls the nerve impulses for many parts of the hand. It passes through the carpal tunnel, which is a passageway made up of bones and ligaments in your wrist.

Repeated motions may cause swelling, which can compress the median nerve inside the tunnel. This swelling can cause a tingling sensation, numbness or pain. If the condition is not treated, the hand muscles can deteriorate to the extent that grasping objects becomes difficult.

The importance of a medical report

Since a repetitive stress injury like carpal tunnel syndrome develops over time, you need testimony from your medical provider that shows the link between your injury and your job. A medical report often is all that is needed to help establish that your injury was work-related.

Your right to benefits after a work injury

If you were injured at work, you have the right to receive financial compensation for your medical expenses, a portion of your lost income and other benefits as appropriate.

Repetitive stress injuries represent some of the most significant sources for workers’ compensation claims in the nation. From asthma to hearing loss to bursitis and carpal tunnel syndrome, there are many claims for work-related injuries that develop gradually. Worker’s comp is designed to help you with your recovery.